Marketing

5 Marketing Leaders Share The Best Marketing Advice They Have Received


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Marketing has come a long way over the years. There are numerous successful marketing campaigns that have left a lasting impact on their target market. And while there have been innovative strategies using unique mediums to effectively reach the right audiences, the basics of marketing still remain the same. It is essential to have a good understanding of the basics of marketing in order to create impactful marketing campaigns. Sharing tips and advice and collaborating with other successful marketing managers is essential to bring about innovation and introduce fresher ideas into the industry.

In order to share the knowledge and talk about the basics of marketing, we asked five successful marketing leaders for the best marketing advice they had ever received. Read on to hear what leaders Dhiren Patel, Katja Pandza, Alex Fowler, Sarah Wassell and Nimrita Bassi say about the best marketing advice they have ever been given.

Dhiren Patel, Senior Marketing Manager at The Economist

I’m an extrovert. Meaning that I get my energy from being around, engaging with and listening to people. Whether you’re an extrovert or not, listening is a key skill for a marketer. Listening to the market, to customers, to your instincts and importantly to others who are willing to share great advice that can stay with you for life. Here’s my top 5:

  1.  “Be agile and dynamic” – Covid-19 has changed the world. By staying nimble and open minded, you’re more likely to find inspiration from the unlikeliest of places and be able to generate ideas that can be turned into solutions to tackle any challenges.

  2.  “Have a growth mindset” – Being willing to learn and believing in oneself will always pay off…be patient as to when it happens.

  3.  “Question as if you’re the customer” – it’s very easy to get carried away with ideas and lose sight of the customer’s viewpoint. Constantly questioning from their perspective acts as a testing tool for your campaign.

  4.  “Come to me with solutions, not problems” – don’t be that person that always reports a problem but doesn’t do anything about it. Investigate the issue, deconstruct it, analyse it, speak to colleagues and do desk research. Then present 2-3 solutions with predicted outcomes.

  5. “KISS and Tweet” – Keep It Simple Superstar! I felt so much more empowered when the final word was changed from “stupid”. In addition, I was told to write copy that’s within the word limit of a tweet. You’ll be surprised at how challenging but rewarding it is.


Katja Pandza, Group Marketing Manager at Kloeckner

Best marketing advice I have received so far was to focus on humanisation and making sure that as a brand we behave in a more human way.

As we intensify the use of digital technologies in our lives it is important, that we consider the dehumanising effect that comes with it. As marketers we need to make sure we strike a balance between the digital process and human relationships.

At Kloeckner we have significantly improved affinity and engagement with our audience by sharing stories and initiatives people could relate to. Being honest, caring, and transparent with your audience, allows them to connect with you in a more emotional way and helps build trust.


Alex Fowler, Marketing Director at Sterling Technology

I have two pieces of advice that have stayed with me over the years. The first one is ‘focus on the priorities that will have a positive impact on the business first’. Marketing needs to drive revenue. Understand your target audience and base your decisions on data, trialling and analytics. Stay focused on the goal and keep going.

The second one is ‘never stop learning and developing your skills’. If you stop, then you will fall behind.


Sarah Wassell, Marketing Strategist, Mentor and Coach at Marketing Matters London

“Get a lead magnet and build your email list” – is what I was told. It’s so true and it’s what I advise all my clients too. I would add – “…as soon as you can!”

Social Media is ‘rented Marketing Real Estate’ and you need to own yours! The best way to do this is to share something super useful to your Ideal Client and in return, you get their email address.

Once you have an email address you can really start to build the relationship and you’re starting from a great position, because you know they’re seeking help or information about your product or service.

A simple and timed stream of planned emails can then follow from you to help build the all important know, like and trust factor required to cement your relationship.


Dr Nimrita Bassi, Managing Director at Marketing Essentials Lab

I have four pieces of advice to share that has served me well in the last ten years. 

Social media is about being social.

Focus on the customer, not the competition. The customers are the ones who will determine your brand’s future.

In digital communications, the nuances of emotion can get lost. Remember humanise, after all brands are human too.

As a lifelong perfectionist, I try to remember: done is better than perfect.